Fred 2.0 (lqc) wrote,
Fred 2.0
lqc

Would that even be legal?

I'm home from the Whittier campus where we spent the night making a silly movie.
You know what's funnier than seeing Andi go on a wild haired story rant, seeing her do it like 10 times in a row and try to keep some form on consistency. Heh, all I have to say is 'Rose Guardian' :P

So yeah, I'm pretty well wired up for 1am, had a snack and checking my email and what not and find this tidbit, filed under Weird with a capital W!

PETA request to Ben & Jerry's via Montpelier Vermont Times Argus
Yahoo's AP report
PETA's view on things


PETA wants Ben & Jerry's to use breast milk

September 25, 2008

By Daniel Barlow Vermont Press Bureau

MONTPELIER – The People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals asked Ben & Jerry's Homemade Ice Cream this week to consider using human breast milk instead of cow's milk in their products.

PETA, an animal rights and vegetarian organization known for outrageous stunts, sent a letter to company co-founders Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield on Tuesday saying consumers and cows would benefit from a switch to human breast milk.

"The breast is best!" wrote PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman in the letter to the company. "Won't you give cows and their babies a break and our health a boost by switching from cow's milk to breast milk in Ben & Jerry's ice cream?"

The Virginia-based non-profit claims in the letter, which it made public on its Web site this week, ties the proposal to alleged health consequences from drinking dairy milk and the treatment of cows at some farms.

Lindsay Rajt, a spokesperson for PETA, said the organization made the request to Ben & Jerry's because of the company's record of supporting socially-progressive causes. She said producing milk from cows for human consumption is hazardous to the animals and to the people who are drinking it.

"Ben & Jerry's is the big one," Rajt said. "We thought that they might be interested in becoming the first big ice cream producer to make the switch to human breast milk."

Ben & Jerry's had little to say about the proposal Wednesday – but they clearly were not signing onto the idea.

"We applaud PETA's creative approach to bring attention to an issue, but we also believe that a mother's milk is best used by a child," said Rob Michalak, a spokesperson at the company's corporate offices in South Burlington.

PETA cites a new restaurant opening in Switzerland called Storchen that plans to use human breast milk in its soups, stews and sauces. Donors will apparently be paid for supplying the restaurant with breast milk.

But the letter did not mention that Storchen's plan ran afoul of health regulators in Switzerland. The restaurant made headlines in Europe when it began advertising in German newspapers looking for human breast milk, but the plan was scrapped after government inspectors threatened to take legal action.

There is some confusion over the country's law, however, because human breast milk is not specifically on the list of banned food substances.

"They are not on the list of approved species such as cows and sheep, but they are also not on the list of the banned species such as apes and primates," Rolf Etter of the Zurich food control laboratory said, as quoted in a Telegraph UK story earlier this month.

A call to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to inquire about any regulations here in the states concerning the use of human breast milk in sold foods was not returned Wednesday.

PETA states in their letter to Ben & Jerry's that consumption of dairy milk by humans can lead to juvenile diabetes, allergies, constipation, obesity and some forms of cancer. That position is disputed by many in the milk field.

"PETA is an animal rights group and they are not interested in health issues for people, but to further their own agenda," said Gary Wheelock, the CEO of the New England Dairy Promotional Board. "They distort facts to further their cause."

Jane Crouse, a public relations associate for La Leche League International, an organization with chapters in Vermont that assist breastfeeding mothers, said PETA's suggestion certainly was interesting – but that several concerns immediately spring to mind.

Crouse said a mother's breast milk is specifically designed to be consumed by her children and any sharing of breast milk to a different child is usually closely screened, similar to that of blood transfusions.

Additionally, she said she wonders if an ice cream company could find a supply of human breast milk large enough to use it in its ingredients.

"Human milk is a wonderful product," she said. "But it is designed to match up with a other and her child and can change from day to day."

This is not the first time that PETA has tried to influence Vermont. Nearly one year, two volunteers from the organization posed nude in downtown Brattleboro in a rally against the use of furs made from animals.

The move came at the height of debate in that town of 12,000 over a proposed ban of public nudity after a small spat of locals and tourists began appearing along Main Street without any clothes on. And earlier this year, PETA senior vice president came to Vermont to promote his memoir, "Committed."


I'm not saying PETAs necessarily wrong, but maybe there is such a thing as too far to be within the realm of reality. Personally I like cow milk more than breast milk, always have I think ever since I was a wee toddler on the farm, before the folks moved into the city. No I don't actually remember any of it, way before the limits of my cluttered memory, but I was told first hand many times from my dad, for what that's worth with a grain of salt.

BTW, did anyone know they had a seasonal Pumpkin Cheesecake flavor? I so want to drive to the store like now and look for it.

Have a happy Friday everyone.
Tags: ice cream, peta, weird
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